Make use of official website to get NCERT books

In India different educational systems are followed. Different committees support educational system. A famous educational committee that supports CBSE educational system in India is the NCERT. NCERT is an educational organization that provides support to educational institutions in their academics. A number of educational bodies in India run their academics as per the syllabus of NCERT. As this syllabus is this much famous, it is important for the students to get the books related to this syllabus.

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Not only for educational purpose, but also the NCERT books are used for some of the competitive exams conducted in India like SSC, RRB and UPSC etc. Therefore, if anyone have the books of NCERT he or she can study the syllabus effectively and able to pass these competitive exams. Nowadays, a lot of students are in need of the NCERT CBSE Solutions and books. Not only students, even teachers also want those books. Thus, in order to help them, the NCERT committee provides their books in their official site.

Download books from official site

Rather than downloading the books of NCERT from other sources, it is best to download those books from the official site of NCERT. One can get different topics books from the official site of NCERT includes

Science

Mathematics

English

Hindi

Statics

Sanskrit

Fine arts

Physics

Chemistry

Biology

Yoga

Political science

Social science

Heritage crafts

Accounting

Business studies

Graphics design

Computer and communication technology etc

Another interesting thing is, these books are available for classes 1 to 12th. Thus, students of these classes can get their required NCERT books from the official site. In addition to the books, there are a lot is available in this site including the daily notes, weekly tutorials, time table, and study tips etc. These all are very useful for the students in their academics.

Those who need printed books of NCERT can get it from the market. All the above said books are available in the market as well as in online shopping sites.

Other sources

Apart from the official website of NCERT, students and teachers can download the NCERT Solutions and CBSE Solutions books from other sources like mycollegebag.in. This is an online website that contains all the study materials of NCERT. Students and teachers who want to get those books can visit this site and subscribe and get their books. This source is available in the form of mobile app also. Anyone can download the mycollegebag app and get their needed information from this app.

How to prepare for Maths in competitive exams

JEE, upsc, how to prepare maths, ibps, ssc, bank po, CAT, GMAT, maths for ssc exam, banking exam, maths tough, education news, indian expressInstead of actual calculations always believe in mental calculations, rounding off and avoid doing rough work

Although it is with every subject that one must have abundant clarity and understanding before appearing for an exam at any stage of life but with Mathematics the level required notches up just a bit.

Since there is a level of competition involved in prestigious examinations like CAT, GMAT, Bank PO’s, Staff Selection Commission, the candidate needs to have a proper strategy to score well in this subject.

In any competition examination, quantitative section constitutes roughly around half of the question paper – directly or indirectly. It may include questions ranging from arithmetic to algebra to geometry to data interpretation to data sufficiency. No examination is deemed to be complete without a major role of quantitative section. Thus, whether you like the subject or not, you cannot ignore Mathematics if you are to appear for a Competition Examination!!

How to deal with the quantitative section

While all the questions may not require advance knowledge of mathematics, conceptual clarity of basics of Mathematics learnt at school level and the tricks to quickly solve questions are something one can’t certainly do without.

Knowing mathematics is different from understanding mathematics. While preparing for the examinations, if the questions have actually been solved by hand and not just read with solutions, you definitely stand a better chance to solve the same more quickly in the exams when it matters the most.

Thus, the first and the only mantra to have a perfect grip over the subject is practice more.

Most of the competition examinations these days have negative marking too. Thus, for students, it turns out to be a two front battle — to solve the maximum number of questions in the least possible time and to solve them correctly. To achieve the twin target one surely needs to ensure to memorise basic formulae/ methods. Also, never attempt to answer a question in first go if you are not 100 per cent sure.

Some of the tips for an efficient problem solving and good results in quantitative section are below:

General quantitative questions

— Memorise squares up to 35, cubes up to 15 and prime numbers up to 150;
— Memorise numerical tables up to 20;
— Remember percentage related fractions up to 1/12 (e.g. 50% = 1/2, 25% = ¼ and so on)
— While sitting in the exam, never pressurise yourself with time factor during initial stages – try to reach the last question within 25-35 per cent of the time scheduled for quantitative section after continuously ticking approximately 50 per cent of the total number of questions
— Memorise shortcuts and discuss them with friends to have perfection

 

— Prefer applying hit and trial methods – wherever possible – before you think of actual working. Some questions can in fact be solved by elimination of choices. Work smartly to all such questions.
— Right from the day you begin preparing for the exam, start making your own notes for short cuts;
— Practice to solve by oral working of calculations as it saves time;
— Emphasise more on high scoring chapters;
— Memorise area formulae for 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional figures;
— Focus on algebraic and Indices formulae;
— Remember important T-ratios (in Trigonometry) and their values;
— Remember Pythagoras Triplets.

Data interpretation questions

— Always glance the data with its units (viz. meter, day, kg, lakhs, etc)
— Have a bird’s eye view of what it contains and swings around;
— Keep a watch on the answer choices – if wider – only then think of rounding and ball park thinking else get down to do the detailed working as per the question demand;
— Rounding should be done with justifications and should look genuine and proportionate;
— Instead of actual calculations always believe in mental calculations, rounding off and avoid doing rough work and
— If any rough work is done, it should be kept a track off so that it is revisited for subsequent questions.

 

Data sufficiency questions

— Never presume or suppose anything other than the information at hand;
— You need not solve the problem actually. Your job is to simply observe whether the problem can be solved or not and a definite result be reached or not with the information available;
— Learn the basic concepts on number systems, inequalities, geometry, equations for ease in data sufficiency roblem solving;
— During practice, actually solve the questions so that it can be easily recalled during the examination.

Five reasons why you need to start your career with them

startups, startup job, startup work culture, career advice, MNC culture, shuttl, how to start career, first job, trainee job, job news, recruitment newsWith most startups hiring brilliant individuals from pedigreed institutes, you get to work with the best brains in the industry. (Image for representational purposes)

There is much caution around startups these days accentuated by the Flipkart-IIT fiasco and the winding-up of a few food-tech ones. However, there is still hope. There is a lot that startups can offer (and much that they can’t).

Having worked with both, start-ups as well as established MNCs, let me explain what would work in your favour early in your career if you do decide to head the startup way.

 

With the entire DNA of start-ups built around entrepreneurship there is no better place to witness courage, first-hand. Our traditional schools, colleges and jobs make us averse to taking risks. We become scared to experiment and hesitant towards new possibilities, comfortably giving-in to the status quo.

But nothing great was ever achieved from one’s comfort-zone. Working with a startup gives you access to co-founders, entrepreneurs and mavericks who inspire you to create, nurture and sustain an idea. An idea that they chase religiously, against all odds and even at the expense of being labelled as deranged at times.

Knowledge

With most startups hiring brilliant individuals from pedigreed institutes, you get to work with the best brains in the industry. (However, intelligence cannot be attributed to pedigree. It’s only a qualifier and not a guarantor of exceptional future performance).

The quality of discussions, access to leadership and the mentorship that you get is truly enriching. Fresh graduates, this is for you: You will cherish this exposure forever. Who knows you might not even require that PG degree you were gunning for.

 

Lateral exposure

One key advantage of working with an early stage startup is that you are not labelled to a particular function. Irrespective of what your degree states, if you believe you can add value better elsewhere and show promise then why not? This is a restrictive attribute in larger organisations (with very few exceptions).

Once your blinkers are on, you are expected to tread that one single path that you see. I personally know many individuals who feel ‘stuck’ with their jobs and see no hope whatsoever of a lateral movement.

Learning Curve

I’ve seen many graduate trainees at startups function and scale up in a way which could put most management trainees from celebrated colleges to shame. I always wondered why some of them were able to perform at such superlative levels with no so-called, traditional management skills?

The simple answer to this is – self-belief. You are offered shoes a couple of sizes bigger to fit-in. What do you do? You ‘grow’ fast, faster than others, and prove your mettle. You unknowingly shoot beyond the traditional performance curve because you never knew that the baseline itself was set way higher than average.

 

Passion

You will come across individuals so maniacally obsessed with the product/service their startup offers that the craziness is sure to rub-on. It’s this selfless passion, commitment and energy that makes startups stand out. You own the idea as much as a founder, right down to the last guy. There’s no greater feeling than watching that idea grow, bigger and better every day.

Having said that, it would take blood, sweat and toil but the journey is worth it. A personal suggestion, though: Never join a startup whose idea you do not identify with. You will never feel connected and without passion you are bound to fail.

 

Despite the above, there will definitely be certain drawbacks (if one may call them) that one might find against a traditional job — work that expands to fill your time, lesser job security, not the swankiest of offices, no frequent corporate lunches, and lots of ambiguity at work. But trust me; the journey is worth it if and only you are willing to dare.

Five reasons why you need to start your career with them

startups, startup job, startup work culture, career advice, MNC culture, shuttl, how to start career, first job, trainee job, job news, recruitment newsWith most startups hiring brilliant individuals from pedigreed institutes, you get to work with the best brains in the industry. (Image for representational purposes)

There is much caution around startups these days accentuated by the Flipkart-IIT fiasco and the winding-up of a few food-tech ones. However, there is still hope. There is a lot that startups can offer (and much that they can’t).

Having worked with both, start-ups as well as established MNCs, let me explain what would work in your favour early in your career if you do decide to head the startup way.

Courage

With the entire DNA of start-ups built around entrepreneurship there is no better place to witness courage, first-hand. Our traditional schools, colleges and jobs make us averse to taking risks. We become scared to experiment and hesitant towards new possibilities, comfortably giving-in to the status quo.

But nothing great was ever achieved from one’s comfort-zone. Working with a startup gives you access to co-founders, entrepreneurs and mavericks who inspire you to create, nurture and sustain an idea. An idea that they chase religiously, against all odds and even at the expense of being labelled as deranged at times.

Knowledge

With most startups hiring brilliant individuals from pedigreed institutes, you get to work with the best brains in the industry. (However, intelligence cannot be attributed to pedigree. It’s only a qualifier and not a guarantor of exceptional future performance).

The quality of discussions, access to leadership and the mentorship that you get is truly enriching. Fresh graduates, this is for you: You will cherish this exposure forever. Who knows you might not even require that PG degree you were gunning for.

 

One key advantage of working with an early stage startup is that you are not labelled to a particular function. Irrespective of what your degree states, if you believe you can add value better elsewhere and show promise then why not? This is a restrictive attribute in larger organisations (with very few exceptions).

Once your blinkers are on, you are expected to tread that one single path that you see. I personally know many individuals who feel ‘stuck’ with their jobs and see no hope whatsoever of a lateral movement.

Learning Curve

I’ve seen many graduate trainees at startups function and scale up in a way which could put most management trainees from celebrated colleges to shame. I always wondered why some of them were able to perform at such superlative levels with no so-called, traditional management skills?

The simple answer to this is – self-belief. You are offered shoes a couple of sizes bigger to fit-in. What do you do? You ‘grow’ fast, faster than others, and prove your mettle. You unknowingly shoot beyond the traditional performance curve because you never knew that the baseline itself was set way higher than average.

 

You will come across individuals so maniacally obsessed with the product/service their startup offers that the craziness is sure to rub-on. It’s this selfless passion, commitment and energy that makes startups stand out. You own the idea as much as a founder, right down to the last guy. There’s no greater feeling than watching that idea grow, bigger and better every day.

Having said that, it would take blood, sweat and toil but the journey is worth it. A personal suggestion, though: Never join a startup whose idea you do not identify with. You will never feel connected and without passion you are bound to fail.

 

Despite the above, there will definitely be certain drawbacks (if one may call them) that one might find against a traditional job — work that expands to fill your time, lesser job security, not the swankiest of offices, no frequent corporate lunches, and lots of ambiguity at work. But trust me; the journey is worth it if and only you are willing to dare.

Students protest against tuition fees

The “grants not debt” march came to a stop outside the Department for Business Innovation and Skills.

A small number of demonstrators dressed in black and with scarves over their faces confronted police and a firework was set off.

The protestors were calling for a “free education”.

A statement from the Metropolitan Police said a “small number of smoke bombs and eggs were thrown at police outside BIS”.

They said there were 12 arrests for public order offences.

Thousands of students had marched through central London, with chants and placards attacking the cost of going to university.

Earlier Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn sent a message of support for the cause of abolishing tuition fees and shadow chancellor John McDonnell addressed the students before the rally.

‘Betrayed’

“Your generation has been betrayed by this government in increases to tuition fees, in scrapping the education maintenance allowance and cuts in education,” Mr McDonnell said.

“Education is a gift from one generation to another, it is not a commodity to be bought and sold,” he told marchers.

John McDonnell
Image captionJohn McDonnell addressed the students ahead of the march

The National Campaign Against Cuts and Fees said that students from campuses around the country took part in the demonstration.

It wants to remove tuition fees, currently up to £9,000 per year in England, and to reverse a decision to convert means-tested maintenance grants into repayable loans.

‘More funding’

“The government is impoverishing the poorest students for minimal gains,” said the campaign’s Callum Cant.

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Media captionStudents protesting against fees gathered outside BIS in Westminster

“It is an attack on the least privileged students which doesn’t save much money and causes misery.

“It is austerity which targets the poorest students. Our worry is that it will make university a lot more inaccessible.”

Student protest 
Image captionThe students want to abolish fees and reinstate maintenance grants

But a spokesman for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, which is responsible for universities, said it was “committed to ensuring everyone with the potential to benefit from higher education has the opportunity to do so, regardless of their background”.

The student funding system was operated so that “lack of finance should not be a barrier to participation and more funding is available to support living costs than ever before”.

SMVITM signs MoU with UAHS to promote collaborative project, research

UDUPI: Shri Madhwa Vadiraja Institute of Technology and Management, Bantakal has signed MoU with University of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Shivamogga in order to promote collaborative project/research work and academic excellence. The MoU was signed at SMVITM, Bantakal, on Saturday in the presence of Sri Vishwavallabha Theertha Swamiji, president of Sri Sode Vadiraja Mutt Education Trust that manages the Institute.

UAHS is first integrated university in Karnataka having agricultural/horticultural sciences under its purview, serving with objective of imparting education in various branches of agriculture and promote partnership with national and international educational and research institutes. SMVITM will join hands with UAHS with objective of providing technical competency to resolve problems related to agriculture/horticulture through collaborative multidisciplinary projects.

The MoU will also contribute to achieve academic excellence through various joint initiatives utilizing the research experience of the scientists of UAHS and technical knowledge of faculty and students of SMVITM. P Srinivas Tantry (vice-president of SSMVET), Raghavendra Tantry (management representative), Harish Belman (technical advisor), Radhakrishna S Aithal (director), Thirumaleshwara Bhat (Principal) and officials of UAHS were present.

Most Indians prefer engineering as a career option

Most Indians prefer engineering as a career option: Report
People in India, USA and Germany have rated engineering as a top career opportunity.

MUMBAI: Even as there are multiple career options, about 80 per cent of Indian students are interested in engineering as they believe that the profession offers high-earning potential and the opportunity to contribute to innovations, according to a report.

In countries with growing economies, engineering holds huge attraction for the next generation, a global report commissioned by Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering said.

“For example, in both India and Turkey, around 80 per cent of 16-17 year olds say they are interested in engineering,” it added.

In India, the interest in engineering was basically matched by the belief that the profession offers high-earning potential and the opportunity to contribute to innovations, as well as the belief that engineering is an interesting and stimulating career, it said.

“I am reassured the ‘Create the Future’ report confirms engineering outputs are valued around the world and considered genuinely life-changing. I take heart in the number of people who see engineering as a great way to contribute to society,” Dr Robert Langer, winner of the 2015 Queen Elizabeth Prize, said.

The inaugural ‘Create the Future’ report of the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering is an international survey of attitudes towards engineering, surveying respondents in global centres for engineering including USA, Germany, Japan, Turkey, India and Brazil.

Narayana Murthy, Founder, Infosys, India said, “Globalisation is changing things. While much of the developed world continues to experience moderate interest in engineering careers, emerging economies are providing a new breeding ground for engineers.”

People in India, USA and Germany have rated engineering as a top career opportunity.

Other favoured professions include business leader,lawyer, doctor and teacher, the report revealed.

It stated that the interest in engineering remains higher amongst men (66 per cent) compared to women (43 per cent).

“Whilst more men than women in all countries show an interest in engineering, the gap in interest is smallest in emerging economies such as India, Turkey, China and Brazil. UK, Japan and South Africa show the greatest difference,” it said.

The report revealed that 57 per cent believe engineering is critical in solving the world’s problems, particularly in USA, UK and Germany.

But in Japan, engineering is seen as a driver of innovation.

The report further said that most people think engineers’ contribution to society is undervalued, they deserve much more recognition.

“About 71 per cent claim that their country’s engineers do not receive the recognition they deserve for their contribution to society,” it added.

‘Re-inventing means reinvention of political science’

VARANASI: The three-day 56th All India Political Science Conference on ‘Re-inventing politics in India’, organised by the department of political science, faculty of social sciences, Banaras Hindu University (BHU) and Indian Political Science Association (IPSA), as a part of the university’s centennial celebrations, began at Swatantrata Bhawan on Sunday.

Addressing the inaugural function, Justice Shiva Kirti Singh of the Supreme Court said political scientists should think about civilization, equality, independence, democracy and welfare of the country. He further asked them to make new principles. While terming constitution as soul of the nation, Singh said the country can become powerful only through its constitution.

Focusing on the theme of the conference, Singh said, ‘re-inventing’ means reinvention of political science and cited an example of the principles of Kautilya in political sciences.

Speaking on the occasion, president of IPSA Gopal Reddy emphasized on the need of reinvention in political sciences and said that the professors of political science need to focus on theoretical as well as characteristic angles.

While presiding over the function, BHU’s vice-chancellor, Prof. GC Tripathi stressed that the political scientists must formulate new principles to strengthen politics. Minister of agriculture and animal husbandry, Jharkhand, Randhir Kumar Singh said that to make India ‘Vishwa Guru’, professors associated with political science must come forward.

Around 1,500 representatives from 28 states along with vice-chancellors of various universities have participated in the three-day conference. Notably, invitations were sent to Prime Minister Narendra Modi, home minister, culture minister, railway minister and foreign minister besides the chief ministers of various states.

Indian Political Science Association (IPSA) is the highest and largest academic and professional body of the teachers and scholars of political science and public administration in India. The first All India Political Science Conference of IPSA was held at BHU in 1938.

Use a strategy: How to prepare for CLAT

The Common Law Admission Test (CLAT), for entry to national law uni versities, is not difficult if you study regularly, work hard and manage your time well. It tests your aptitude. One should analyse past years’ papers to understand the type of questions asked.

I had a strategy for each subject. In English, there was considerable stress on comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, etc, for which I relied on notes provided by my coaching institute. I also used to read newspapers religiously to improve my comprehension skills and reading speed. When the CLAT went online, I started reading articles online to train myself to attempt the paper on the computer. Maths is elementary. Questions are generally based on what we have read up to class X. I studied a book on quantitative aptitude, which helped me prepare for the subject. For the legal reasoning portion, I referred to previous papers.

UDC exam: Puducherry government promises strict vigil

PUDUCHERRY: The Puducherry government on Saturday said it had taken necessary measures to conduct the competitive examination for recruitment to the post of upper division clerk in a fair and transparent manner. Secretary (personnel and administrative reforms) S Sundaravadivelu said the selection of candidates will be purely on merit.

His statement comes in wake of widespread complaints of corruption in recruitment process from different quarters including ruling party MLA G Nehru.

Sundaravadivelu said the department of personnel and administrative reforms follows ‘very transparent method of selection’ and advised the candidates not to fall prey to any false promises from any quarters. “Complaints about persons offering to get UDC posts on consideration other than their performance in the examination may be provided to secretary (personnel) and superintendent of police (vigilance and anti-corruption) for necessary action as per law,” he said.

Outlining the measures undertaken to prevent malpractices in the recruitment process he said the candidates will be allowed to take question booklets and a carbon copy of their optical mark reading (OMR) sheets with them after the completion of the exam.

The department will host the answer keys in its website tentatively at 10am on October 26 inviting objections if any for the keys displayed. The candidates can evaluate their OMR sheets using the answer key.

The answer sheets that will reach the evaluation centre in sealed packets will be evaluated by optical scanners in the presence of senior government officials.

The marks obtained by the candidates will be hosted on the website and the candidates can crosscheck the evaluation. Sundaravadivelu said flying squads will be on duty apart from the invigilators to prevent copying and other malpractices in the examination hall.

He also instructed the candidates to use black or blue ball point pens to mark the OMR sheets and not by pencil to prevent chances of altering the answers at any stage. The competitive examination will be held on October 25 in all the four regions of the Union Territory.